When you are looking to take on the challenge of the Camino de Santiago, the Camino Portugues or Portuguese Way is an excellent choice for those wishing to grow spiritually and take on the physical challenge of the pilgrimage against a stunning rural backdrop.

There are many camino routes to choose from on the Camino de Santiago and all will deliver an experience you will never forget. The Camino Portugues is one of those routes and offers travellers the essence of the pilgrimage, with a wide range of landscapes and scenery and the chance to try amazing new local gastronomy along the way.

Completing this route will leave you with a sense of fresh perspective on the world, and break from the rat race and an opportunity to truly reflect and experience new things.

Start your journey in the amazing city of Lisbon

Lisbon is already on the bucket list for many in it’s own right, as one of the the stunning great capitals of Europe. Beautiful architecture lines cobbled streets and the influence of trade through the years due to its location where the Tagus River meets the Atlantic Ocean, is easy to see. It is for good reason it is nicknamed the ‘City of Light’.

It is also the start point for the Camino Portugues, and while you are there it is highly recommended to visit the quaint squares and the castle of São Jorge or the UNESCO World Heritage sites of Jerónimos Monastery and the Belém Tower.

Planning the stages of the journey is key to a successful journey

When planning your journey you will need to make sure that you have considered how far you will walk each day when leaving Lisbon, where you will stop for both food and overnight, and the practicalities of moving luggage from one stop to the next.

This is why many people turn to santiagoways, local regional experts in the Camino de Santiago that are familiar with each stage, have direct long standing relationships with the guest houses along the way, and intimate knowledge of the best places to try local cuisine. They can even offer support in provision of a 24 hour helpline, transfer of luggage and of course help with any language barriers in the booking process. You can build the exact itinerary for you and your group.

A route that takes you through beautiful rural landscapes

This route is fantastic for both the landscape and the historical towns and villages along the way. For example the stunning Arab city of Santarém, or Coimbra, home to another UNESCO World Heritage Site the University – one of the oldest universities in the world.

The route also travels through Porto, the birthplace of Port wine before crossing the border in Galicia, Spain. You go from impressive Atlantic coastlines to green rolling hills and fairytale forests, passing through rural villages. Stop to see the many baroque churches and other historic architecture.

Crossing into Spain you will need to cross the famous International Bridge across the Miño River. It forms the start of the final leg of the Camino de Santiago, passing through forests and traditional farmlands arriving at the Galician coastal city of Arcade, famous for its famous annual oyster festival.

A great achievement when you arrive at your final destination

When you finally reach the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, the feeling can be euphoric. You will have challenged yourself in every way possible, and you can deserve to feel a sense of achievement in that.

You will be able to take part in the Pilgrim’s Mass at the Cathedral, and those pilgrims who receive the compostela the day before can have their countries of origin and start point announced during the mass. You will also be able to receive the ‘Compostela’ as proof of your great journey. So what are you waiting for, it’s time to get planning your trip and do a little soul searching along the way.

For many employees, the modern workforce is increasingly transitioning toward remote possibilities. Remote work becomes more popular every year and offers employees improved balance and flexibility. But that doesn’t mean that working from home is easy. Staying engaged and organized throughout the day can be a reoccurring struggle, especially when employees are trying to adjust. To help you get the most out of your remote experience, we’ve put together everything you need to know about staying productive and organized while working from home.

Set Clear Expectations

The first step toward staying organized at home is establishing clear expectations with those around you. People often misunderstand that just because you’re home, doesn’t mean you are available. Help roommates, children, your partner, or anyone else living in the home understand that you are still working and can’t always socialize or be disturbed. You might also consider hiring a part-time babysitter during your most productive hours. This understanding is also important for any outside friends and family who might expect anytime availability.

Create A Work Environment

Working from home gives you comfort and freedom, but that doesn’t mean every day is pajama day. Getting dressed and prepared every morning will help you feel more alert and ready to go. Similarly, it’s important to set aside a designated desk, office, or work area. Establishing a specific workspace mentally prepares you to be at work and removes the temptation to finally clean your room, do a little meal prep, catch up on a new episode, or give in to whatever kind of at home distractions threaten your productivity.

Set A Regular Schedule

Humans are ultimately creatures of habit and work best to well-defined patterns. Setting a regular work schedule creates familiarity, making it easier to get started and stay organized throughout the day. Most importantly though, a work schedule establishes a regular start and stop time to your workday. This helps you stay dedicated during work hours and improves regular coworker contact. An established stop time also creates an effective work/life balance. Working sporadically can easily extend a normal workload into a 10 or 12 hour day.

Utilize Your Productivity

Just because you create a work schedule, don’t feel like you have to be confined to the traditional 8-5. One of the best parts of working remotely is the freedom to create an accommodating schedule. This can mean working around existing obligation, but it can also mean utilizing your most productive moments. If you work best during the evening hours or are refreshed after a midmorning run, build your schedule around those opportunities. Remote work lets you unlock your best abilities by taking advantage of nontraditional or even nonconsecutive work times.

Keep A Paper Planner

Planners are the best way to keep track of both day to day activities and unusual or sporadic events. Planners visually represent the day, making it easier to understand and prepare for, and helping you to feel more organized and in control. Paper planners are particularly beneficial for staying organized while working at home. Paper planners, unlike their digital counterparts, are put away at the end of the day and inaccessible outside of your designated workspace. This gives you work a sense of completion, making the transition from work time to social time much easier.

Regular Self Reflection

Staying organized while working from home also means more self-awareness and accountability. While breaks are important of course, it’s easy for them to get out of hand. Take time to identify your most distracting time wasters and put methods in place to make them less accessible, especially when you are stressed or bored. Regularly follow up with yourself about spending time and minimizing distractions appropriately. Keeping an occasional time log of your activities can also be used to give you a gauge of how distracted you are during the typical day.

Keep Up With Your Office

Working remotely can feel isolating, and remote workers often report feeling lonely or out of the loop. It’s important to make the extra effort to keep in contact with your office and your coworkers regularly. Regular contact will keep you organize and up-to-date and will help you strengthen social relationships with your coworkers. If you work freelance or are unable to connect with your coworkers often, set aside time to talk with a roommate, a neighbor, or even a barista every once and a while.

While working from home brings freedom, adaptation and better work/life balance, it also comes with its fair share of challenges. Staying focused, organized and on task in a home office can feel like a monumental task, especially if your bed is only a few feet away. Thankfully, with increased technology, the workforce is learning to adapt and improvise together. With a little practice and dedication, staying organized while working at home can be a breeze.